Call Today! 386-428-1316

Nano

More About AMA

The origin and history of Martial Arts is a controversial issue. One can see signs of martial arts in Egyptian, Greek, African, Japanese, Chinese, Thai, as well  as other cultures.

The first fighting systems on earth probably evolved alongside humans because mankind must have always had a need to defend himself against animals, as well as against his fellow man. Ancient murals and sculptures show fighting poses from Egypt, India and Babylon dating from as far back as 5,000 years ago. The martial arts as we know them probably did not evolve until systems of offensive and defensive skills were devised in or imported into China. These fighting skills were combined with intangible elements such as compassion, discipline and self-control.

Read More...

Newsletter Signup

Please sign up for our news letter and receive valuable information and seasonal discounts on special programs, training gear and much more, we promise that we will never sell or compromise your email address.

Brazilian Ju Jitsu

Our AMA Brazilian Ju Jitsu America program is a world class Brazilian Ju Jitsu organization designed by master martial artists John Will and David Meyer to introduce and infuse the highest quality grappling program in the martial arts today.

Grappling skills continues to become more apparent and popular in todays martial arts and street defense scenarios. Martial arts student or not, AMAT BJJ America's Grappling Curriculum is an easy way to diversify and add value to your self-defense training.

Why should I learn to grapple - I can already fight well enough?

When there are no rules, and no class or sparring etiquette is in play, people very often end up in a clinch or in an unexpected grappling situation on the floor. Sometimes this is due to the fact that a real-life aggressor, simply doesn't know what sparring means and bulldozers his way into your face - at other times, there is just not the room that we are used to in the martial arts classroom and before we know it, we're grappling. We are not saying that grappling should replace good strong 'stand-up' fighting skills; we are saying that it should be a supplement to those skills, in case the need arises. Also, there are simply times where it is just best to take the opponent down and completely control him, without resorting to striking and percussive techniques. In this ever more litigious society, controlling an aggressor via grappling techniques can be both a 'court' and 'media' friendly option. Being skilled in grappling also allows us to bring a larger, stronger and more motivated aggressor under control very, very quickly - a real confidence builder! Knowing you have grappling skills to back up your 'stand up' skills, means that you are much more complete - both as a martial artist and as a fighter.

When we spar no one ends up grappling?

Many martial artists believe that because they have never been forced into a grappling situation while sparring, that the choice of whether or not to grapple is theirs to make. Nothing could be further from the truth. Many martial artists mistakenly believe that no one could possibly close the distance and grapple with them - well that's because they have probably never asked someone to try. When sparring, both students are 'playing the sparring game', trying to set up the proper distance for a strike. Neither is specifically trying to clinch and grapple. Test this out - just get a few senior students, and direct them to try their best to close the distance on you and take you to the floor (don't forget to use adequate protective gear for all participants) - and you do your best to stop them. You may be surprised at how easy it is for someone who is motivated to cover those two yards and who is not even trained in grappling to tackle an opponent to the floor. Now think about the street scenario - where the opponent isn't sparring - where there is no 'gap' to cover - and you begin to realize that grappling can be a naturally occurring part of the fight dynamic. But this need not be a bad thing. It doesn't take a lot of work to make huge gains in grappling skills - provided you are following a plan and a well-tested methodology. This puts you in the drivers seat should circumstances bring you to the ground.

How long does it take to become proficient in grappling or Brazilian Ju Jitsu?

This is one of the biggest benefits of adding a grappling component to your self-defense. Unlike "stand-up" fighting skills, it doesn't take very long to know a whole lot more than someone who hasn't been trained in grappling. In a matter of a few months, students have a huge edge over the average person who does not have grappling skills. You see, even an untrained fighter knows to make a fist and hit, but very few people know what to do when the fight goes to the ground. Once there, we have a plan, the opponent has no idea. Within 12 months of learning with our clear curriculum, the average person with little or no athletic ability can learn to successfully deal with a larger and stronger opponent.

Short About Us

The United Fighting Arts Federation (UFAF) is an increasingly worldwide martial arts organization founded by Mr. Chuck Norris. Members of the organization study the style of Chun Kuk Do ("The Universal Way").

Contact Us

American Martial Arts

Y323 N Orange St., New Smyrna Beach, FL. 32168

(386) 428-1316

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.